READY, SET, START YOUR OVENS!

The (3rd Annual) NEED TO KNEAD has moved to OUR KRAZY KITCHEN.
We all have some favorite family bread recipes tucked away.
I know that at certain times I have the NEED TO KNEAD, primarily during the holidays or from October through April, those long cold months of winter.
The rest of the time my Bread Machine Rules.
I thought we could all come together and share our daily bread recipes.
And I mean all breads! White, wheat, banana, braided, etc…
whatever you’re in the mood to share.
Ironically National bread month is November at the beginning of our holiday baking crunch.

Just post your recipes anytime until November 15, 2010, go over and link up at OUR KRAZY KITCHEN so that we can all visit you. You can even link to recipes you have previously posted. Add this button to your participating posts and link to this blog. Your blog can be in any language, but a translator on your site will help any who don’t speak the same language.

Bread History According to National Bread Month:

..”It was only after the Pilgrims came to America that baking bread in private homes became the norm. Our ancient forbearers baked bread in communal ovens. These ovens were built on the out skirts of villages, near water due to the extreme fire hazards of the early brick ovens. Later in Europe, after the Romans taught the indigenous peoples about bread making, bread was still baked in large ovens. Except these ovens were not communal ovens they were owned, as was the mill, by the local lord. This made families dependant on the lord for their daily bread. By the Middle Ages baking guilds controlled who and how bread were baked and sold. These organizations limited the number of bakers and bakeries in each village and that meant even impoverished peasants had to purchase bread.

When the first colonists came to North America they demanded the right to be in control of their daily bread. Households at last could bake bread at home. Even commoners were in control of their daily bread….”

Resource LinkCelebrate National Bread Month with crusty water rolls: recipe

Bread is one of the oldest prepared foods, dating back to the Neolithic era. The first breads produced were probably cooked versions of a grain-paste, made from ground cereal grains and water, and may have been developed by accidental cooking or deliberate experimentation with water and grain flour. Descendants of these early breads are still commonly made from various grains worldwide, including the Mexican tortilla, Indian chapatis, rotis and naans, Scottish oatcake, North American johnnycake, Middle Eastern Pita bread (Kmaj in Arabic and Pitot in Hebrew) and Ethiopian injera. The basic flat breads of this type also formed a staple in the diet of many early civilizations with the Sumerians eating a type of barley flat cake, and the 12th century BC Egyptians being able to purchase a flat bread called ta from stalls in the village streets. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bread

Have you heard about the Need to Knead Bread Roundup?  The need to knead bread round-up is almost here. I thought maybe it was time to share with you some food for thought (Pun intended) with a few great resource sites for baking.
  • Recipe Curio has a lot of wonderful tips as well as many vintage recipes
  • Yeast Dough gets down to the basics of the ingredients and how to work with them.
  • Bread World is Fleischmann’s Yeast site for recipes and baking tips.
  • Bread Baking 101 is all encompassing site of information and recipes.
 General Tips to remember:
  • Baking in a high place, a dry place or in a place that can have sudden changes in barometric pressure. All these factors can alter how yeast breads knead, rise and bake.
  • To determine if your yeast is still active, dissolve 1 tsp. sugar in 1/2 cup lukewarm water in a see-through measuring cup. Sprinkle 1 tbsp. yeast slowly over the water. Stir and let stand for 10 minutes. At the end of this time, the yeast should have foamed up to reach the 1 cup mark. Yeast that does not reach this mark in 10 minutes will not produce a good loaf and should be discarded.
  • Water can replace milk. The texture will change a little, but the bread will still be very tasty and good to eat.
  • White sugar, brown sugar, honey and molasses can be interchanged equally in bread dough. The sugar in bread dough supplies the tiny yeast plants with instant food and gets them off to a fast start. Artificial sweeteners are not recommended for yeast breads because they cannot be used by the yeast as natural sweeteners can.
  • Fats can be replaced with applesauce or prune puree. The texture of the bread will be more dense. A general rule of thumb is to substitute 1 1/2 tablespoons of applesauce/prune puree for every 3 tablespoons of fat.
  • Salt is added to yeast breads not only for flavor but also to keep the yeast fermentation in the bread dough under control. Too little salt will allow the yeast to push the dough so high that it may even collapse. Too much salt will keep the dough from rising enough.
In preparation for the upcoming National Bread Month in November and for our driving desires and “NEED TO KNEAD” as well as the upcoming Holidays let’s all join in together on October 31st, 2010 to November 15, 2010 and round-up all of our delicious bread recipes to look back on when we need to bake fantastic bread. I know many of mine were handed down by my grandma.
~ We are looking for all sorts of breads: quick breads, savory breads, sweet ones, yeast breads, no-knead breads, 5-minute breads, vintage or gluten-free breads, etc, etc, etc!

~ Help us promote this bread roundup by putting the above banner in your sidebars and posting about the 3rd Annual Need to Kneed Roundup on your own blogs.

~ We would love it if you would join us, and we would love it if you would help us spread the word by putting this button in your sidebars or even writing a short post about the roundup. Post your links from October 31, 2010 to November 15, 2010 for all your bread recipes.

~ Have fun blog hopping through the bread recipes, make new friends, find new family-favorite recipes, comment, enjoy the process of community-building.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

READY, SET, START YOUR OVENS!

We all have some favorite family bread recipes tucked away.
I know that at certain times I have the NEED TO KNEAD, primarily during the holidays or from October through April, those long cold months of winter.
The rest of the time my Bread Machine Rules.
I thought we could all come together and share our daily bread recipes.
And I mean all breads! White, wheat, banana, braided, etc…
whatever you’re in the mood to share.
Ironically National bread month is November at the beginning of our holiday baking crunch.
 

Just post your recipes anytime until November 15, 2010, go over and link up at OUR KRAZY KITCHEN so that we can all visit you. You can even link to recipes you have previously posted. Add this button to your participating posts and link to this blog. Your blog can be in any language, but a translator on your site will help any who don’t speak the same language.

Bread History According to National Bread Month:

..”It was only after the Pilgrims came to America that baking bread in private homes became the norm. Our ancient forbearers baked bread in communal ovens. These ovens were built on the out skirts of villages, near water due to the extreme fire hazards of the early brick ovens. Later in Europe, after the Romans taught the indigenous peoples about bread making, bread was still baked in large ovens. Except these ovens were not communal ovens they were owned, as was the mill, by the local lord. This made families dependant on the lord for their daily bread. By the Middle Ages baking guilds controlled who and how bread were baked and sold. These organizations limited the number of bakers and bakeries in each village and that meant even impoverished peasants had to purchase bread.

When the first colonists came to North America they demanded the right to be in control of their daily bread. Households at last could bake bread at home. Even commoners were in control of their daily bread….”

Resource LinkCelebrate National Bread Month with crusty water rolls: recipe

Bread is one of the oldest prepared foods, dating back to the Neolithic era. The first breads produced were probably cooked versions of a grain-paste, made from ground cereal grains and water, and may have been developed by accidental cooking or deliberate experimentation with water and grain flour. Descendants of these early breads are still commonly made from various grains worldwide, including the Mexican tortilla, Indian chapatis, rotis and naans, Scottish oatcake, North American johnnycake, Middle Eastern Pita bread (Kmaj in Arabic and Pitot in Hebrew) and Ethiopian injera. The basic flat breads of this type also formed a staple in the diet of many early civilizations with the Sumerians eating a type of barley flat cake, and the 12th century BC Egyptians being able to purchase a flat bread called ta from stalls in the village streets. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bread

Have you heard about the Need to Knead Bread Roundup?  The need to knead bread round-up is almost here. I thought maybe it was time to share with you some food for thought (Pun intended) with a few great resource sites for baking.
  • Recipe Curio has a lot of wonderful tips as well as many vintage recipes
  • Yeast Dough gets down to the basics of the ingredients and how to work with them.
  • Bread World is Fleischmann’s Yeast site for recipes and baking tips.
  • Bread Baking 101 is all encompassing site of information and recipes.
 General Tips to remember:
  • Baking in a high place, a dry place or in a place that can have sudden changes in barometric pressure. All these factors can alter how yeast breads knead, rise and bake.
  • To determine if your yeast is still active, dissolve 1 tsp. sugar in 1/2 cup lukewarm water in a see-through measuring cup. Sprinkle 1 tbsp. yeast slowly over the water. Stir and let stand for 10 minutes. At the end of this time, the yeast should have foamed up to reach the 1 cup mark. Yeast that does not reach this mark in 10 minutes will not produce a good loaf and should be discarded.
  • Water can replace milk. The texture will change a little, but the bread will still be very tasty and good to eat.
  • White sugar, brown sugar, honey and molasses can be interchanged equally in bread dough. The sugar in bread dough supplies the tiny yeast plants with instant food and gets them off to a fast start. Artificial sweeteners are not recommended for yeast breads because they cannot be used by the yeast as natural sweeteners can.
  • Fats can be replaced with applesauce or prune puree. The texture of the bread will be more dense. A general rule of thumb is to substitute 1 1/2 tablespoons of applesauce/prune puree for every 3 tablespoons of fat.
  • Salt is added to yeast breads not only for flavor but also to keep the yeast fermentation in the bread dough under control. Too little salt will allow the yeast to push the dough so high that it may even collapse. Too much salt will keep the dough from rising enough.
In preparation for the upcoming National Bread Month in November and for our driving desires and “NEED TO KNEAD” as well as the upcoming Holidays let’s all join in together on October 31st, 2010 to November 15, 2010 and round-up all of our delicious bread recipes to look back on when we need to bake fantastic bread. I know many of mine were handed down by my grandma.
~ We are looking for all sorts of breads: quick breads, savory breads, sweet ones, yeast breads, no-knead breads, 5-minute breads, vintage or gluten-free breads, etc, etc, etc!

~ Help us promote this bread roundup by putting the above banner in your sidebars and posting about the 3rd Annual Need to Kneed Roundup on your own blogs.

~ We would love it if you would join us, and we would love it if you would help us spread the word by putting this button in your sidebars or even writing a short post about the roundup. Post your links from October 31, 2010 to November 15, 2010 for all your bread recipes.

~ Have fun blog hopping through the bread recipes, make new friends, find new family-favorite recipes, comment, enjoy the process of community-building.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

READY, SET, START YOUR OVENS!

We all have some favorite family bread recipes tucked away.
I know that at certain times I have the NEED TO KNEAD, primarily during the holidays or from October through April, those long cold months of winter.
The rest of the time my Bread Machine Rules.
I thought we could all come together and share our daily bread recipes.
And I mean all breads! White, wheat, banana, braided, etc…
whatever you’re in the mood to share.
Ironically National bread month is November at the beginning of our holiday baking crunch.
 

Just post your recipes anytime until November 15, 2010, come back here to link up so that we can all visit you. You can even link to recipes you have previously posted. Add this button to your participating posts and link to this blog. Your blog can be in any language, but a translator on your site will help any who don’t speak the same language.

Bread History According to National Bread Month:

..”It was only after the Pilgrims came to America that baking bread in private homes became the norm. Our ancient forbearers baked bread in communal ovens. These ovens were built on the out skirts of villages, near water due to the extreme fire hazards of the early brick ovens. Later in Europe, after the Romans taught the indigenous peoples about bread making, bread was still baked in large ovens. Except these ovens were not communal ovens they were owned, as was the mill, by the local lord. This made families dependant on the lord for their daily bread. By the Middle Ages baking guilds controlled who and how bread were baked and sold. These organizations limited the number of bakers and bakeries in each village and that meant even impoverished peasants had to purchase bread.

When the first colonists came to North America they demanded the right to be in control of their daily bread. Households at last could bake bread at home. Even commoners were in control of their daily bread….”

Resource LinkCelebrate National Bread Month with crusty water rolls: recipe

Bread is one of the oldest prepared foods, dating back to the Neolithic era. The first breads produced were probably cooked versions of a grain-paste, made from ground cereal grains and water, and may have been developed by accidental cooking or deliberate experimentation with water and grain flour. Descendants of these early breads are still commonly made from various grains worldwide, including the Mexican tortilla, Indian chapatis, rotis and naans, Scottish oatcake, North American johnnycake, Middle Eastern Pita bread (Kmaj in Arabic and Pitot in Hebrew) and Ethiopian injera. The basic flat breads of this type also formed a staple in the diet of many early civilizations with the Sumerians eating a type of barley flat cake, and the 12th century BC Egyptians being able to purchase a flat bread called ta from stalls in the village streets. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bread

Have you heard about the Need to Knead Bread Roundup?  The need to knead bread round-up is almost here. I thought maybe it was time to share with you some food for thought (Pun intended) with a few great resource sites for baking.
  • Recipe Curio has a lot of wonderful tips as well as many vintage recipes
  • Yeast Dough gets down to the basics of the ingredients and how to work with them.
  • Bread World is Fleischmann’s Yeast site for recipes and baking tips.
  • Bread Baking 101 is all encompassing site of information and recipes.
 General Tips to remember:
  • Baking in a high place, a dry place or in a place that can have sudden changes in barometric pressure. All these factors can alter how yeast breads knead, rise and bake.
  • To determine if your yeast is still active, dissolve 1 tsp. sugar in 1/2 cup lukewarm water in a see-through measuring cup. Sprinkle 1 tbsp. yeast slowly over the water. Stir and let stand for 10 minutes. At the end of this time, the yeast should have foamed up to reach the 1 cup mark. Yeast that does not reach this mark in 10 minutes will not produce a good loaf and should be discarded.
  • Water can replace milk. The texture will change a little, but the bread will still be very tasty and good to eat.
  • White sugar, brown sugar, honey and molasses can be interchanged equally in bread dough. The sugar in bread dough supplies the tiny yeast plants with instant food and gets them off to a fast start. Artificial sweeteners are not recommended for yeast breads because they cannot be used by the yeast as natural sweeteners can.
  • Fats can be replaced with applesauce or prune puree. The texture of the bread will be more dense. A general rule of thumb is to substitute 1 1/2 tablespoons of applesauce/prune puree for every 3 tablespoons of fat.
  • Salt is added to yeast breads not only for flavor but also to keep the yeast fermentation in the bread dough under control. Too little salt will allow the yeast to push the dough so high that it may even collapse. Too much salt will keep the dough from rising enough.
In preparation for the upcoming National Bread Month in November and for our driving desires and “NEED TO KNEAD” as well as the upcoming Holidays let’s all join in together on October 31st, 2010 to November 15, 2010 and round-up all of our delicious bread recipes to look back on when we need to bake fantastic bread. I know many of mine were handed down by my grandma.
~ We are looking for all sorts of breads: quick breads, savory breads, sweet ones, yeast breads, no-knead breads, 5-minute breads, vintage or gluten-free breads, etc, etc, etc!

~ Help us promote this bread roundup by putting the above banner in your sidebars and posting about the 3rd Annual Need to Kneed Roundup on your own blogs.

~ We would love it if you would join us, and we would love it if you would help us spread the word by putting this button in your sidebars or even writing a short post about the roundup. Come back October 31, 2010 to November 15, 2010 to link all your bread recipes.

~ Have fun blog hopping through the bread recipes, make new friends, find new family-favorite recipes, comment, enjoy the process of community-building.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

THERE’S A HOUSEWARMING PARTY GOING ON…

No beach party would be complete without at least a few songs from The Beach Boys like ‘Kokomo’! If your style is more hip, Reggae music is good too. A little Bob Marley singing “One Love“!
We’re throwing a house/beach warming party over at OUR KrAzY kitchen for one of our awesome contributors, Dave from My Year on the Grill who had the horrible misfortune (big sarcastic laugh here) of being forced to move from snowy and cold Kansas to the Virgin Islands, It’s a surprise party that we’re telling him about tomorrow so you have time to get your recipe together and head on over to OUR KrAzY kitchen to link up. The more the merrier so be sure to come to the party.

So I’m making a menu from all the wonderful ideas I got over at Bahama Breeze.

CREOLE BAKED GOAT CHEESE
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 tablespoon garlic, minced
½ cup Vidalia onion, diced small
4 ounces fresh goat cheese
2 Roma tomatoes, seeded and diced small
1 tablespoon fresh cilantro, chopped
¼ teaspoon Frank’s Hot pepper sauce
Sea salt and fresh ground black pepper to taste
Roasted red pepper cups
Garlic crouton rounds

  • Heat olive oil in a medium sauté pan over medium heat, then add the garlic and onions and sauté just until the onions become translucent.
  • Remove from heat and cool to room temperature.
  • Transfer the onion-garlic mixture to a mixing bowl and add the remaining ingredients. Mix to thoroughly blend.
  • Adjust seasonings with salt and pepper to taste.
  • Fill roasted red pepper cups with goat cheese mixture and bake in a 350 ºF preheated oven for 10 minutes.
  • Now, place the garlic crouton rounds in the oven and bake for an additional 5 minutes.
  • Remove from the oven and transfer the pepper cups to the center of a serving platter and arrange the baked croutons in a circle around the pepper cups.
  • Serve with a fresh tomato salsa on the side.

Note: When eating this dish, we recommend cutting the pepper cups into wedges for the full experience of eating the filling with the red pepper.

ROASTED RED PEPPER CUPS
1 medium red bell pepper
1 Tbsp Olive oil as needed Salt & pepper

  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  • Cut red pepper in half to form a top and bottom.
  • Remove and discard the seeds and trim the stem to allow the top half pepper cup to stand up.
  • Rub the inside of the pepper cups with olive oil and season them lightly with salt and pepper.
  • Place them in a pie plate, cut side up, and bake them for 5 minutes.
  • During this roasting step you will be just slightly softening the pepper. The final cooking will take place after the pepper cups are stuffed.
  • Allow the cups to cool upside down to allow the excess juice to drain out prior to filling with the goat cheese mixture.

GARLIC CROUTON ROUNDS
½ loaf French baguette, cut into ¼” slices
4 tablespoon butter, softened
1 clove garlic, finely minced
1 tablespoon fresh chopped parsley

  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  • Cut the bread crosswise into 16 ¼” thick slices. Set aside.
  • In a small mixing bowl, blend the garlic, chopped parsley and softened butter until thoroughly mix.
  • Spread the top and bottom of each slice of bread with about ½ tsp of garlic butter on each side.
  • Place the buttered croutons on a cookie sheet.
  • Bake for 5 minutes.

JERK CHICKEN PASTA
4 boneless chicken breasts, cut into small strips
1/2 cup butter
4-5 garlic cloves, minced
1 cup half-and-half
1/2 cup chicken broth
1 teaspoon cornstarch
1 teaspoon marjoram
1 tablespoon cayenne pepper
1/2 pound mushrooms, sliced
fresh chopped parsley
salt and pepper, to taste
8 ounces bowtie or angel hairpasta

  • Melt butter in skillet over medium/low heat and add garlic.
  • When garlic becomes fragrant add cayenne pepper and chicken (already cut up into small strips/slices or whole), increase heat.
  • Cook until chicken is cooked to preferred tenderness. Remove chicken from pan, leaving the butter/garlic/cayenne mix.
  • In a separate deep pan, cook pasta according to the package directions. Set aside.
  • In a cup whisk together half-and-half, chicken broth, and corn starch.
  • Pour into skillet with the garlic mixture. Add mushrooms.
  • Bring to a boil, reduce heat, then simmer for 3-5 minutes over LOW heat, constantly stirring.
  • Stir in the parsley, marjoram to heat through and allow flavors to blend.
  • Add chicken to heat through.
  • Add pasta and stir to heat through.

When I decided to bring some Chocolate pineapple upside down cake I scoured the net for recipes. I couldn’t find one that I was completely happy with (though the above one from Bahama breeze was a total inspiration) so here is my compilation recipe that incorporates all my favorite ingredients:

CHOCOLATE CHERRY PINEAPPLE UPSIDE DOWN CAKE
1 (21 ounce) can cherry pie filling
1 can pineapple rings, well drained
2 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
1 1/2 cups granulated sugar
2/3 cup unsweetened cocoa
1 1/2 teaspoons baking soda
3/4 teaspoon sea salt
1 1/2 cups water
1/4 cup safflower oil
1 teaspoon blackberry extract
1/4 cup vinegar
1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract

  • Heat oven to 350 degrees.
  • Spread pie filling into a well greased 13 x 9-inch baking dish.
  • Strategically lay the pineapple rings on top of the cherries.
  • Sift together the flour with the sugar, cocoa, baking soda and salt.
  • In a separate bowl, combine water, oil, vinegar, blackberry and vanilla extracts.
  • Add the liquid to the dry mixture and stir just until moistened; pour into the pan over pie filling.
  • Bake for 30 to 35 minutes.
  • Cool in the pan for 10 minutes.
  • Invert pan onto a plate.
  • Cool completely.

Now we have to also have a fruity foo foo drink. I mean it is the islands after all! Here is the recipe for:

BREEZE RUM PUNCH
1 jigger Malibu Rum
1 jigger Bacardi Rum
1 jigger DeKuyper Peach Schnapps
1/4 cup mango juice
1/2 cup pineapple juice
1/4 cup orange juice
1/4 cup guava juice

  • Mix and serve Ice Cold!
  • Garnish with pineapple slice, orange slice and maraschino cherries.

If you have the time make ice cubes ahead of time using fruit juices so as they melt they meld into the drinks.

Or perhaps you’d like a

BLOOD ORANGE MAI TAI
1 oz Dark Rum
1 oz Silver Rum
1 oz Coconut Rum (I used Bacardi Coco)
1/2 oz Cointreau
1/4 oz Amaretto
1/2 blood orange, juiced
1/2 lime, juiced

  • Fill a cocktail shaker with ice.
  • Add all ingredients above and gently shake to combine.
  • Strain into a glass filled with ice and garnish with slices of blood orange and lime.

And here is another fun site for lots of other rum punches.
Jerk Cooking suggestions.

aprons 3

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

It’s time to get the party started!

REMEMBER ALL REGULAR MEMES WILL APPEAR BELOW THIS PARTY
Christmas cookie badge

We’re having a Christmas party here at the OuR KrAzY kItChEn and you’re invited. Bring your favorite recipe, decorating idea, pictures, anecdotes and let’s have some fun together.
  • Do you have a special Christmas Cookie recipe?
  • What is your favorite holiday recipe?
  • Do you have a favorite fudge recipe?
  • Do you have special way to decorate the tree?
  • How about a party punch that’s perfect for a holiday party?
  • What is your idea of the perfect family holiday?

  • Stop by the buffet table and grab a cup of egg nog and a plate of goodies.
  • Sign Mr. Linky and let us know what you’re bring to the party using the following format. For example: Tamy @ 3 Sides of Crazy (Peanut Butter Fudge Drops) or Martha @ Menagerie (POM Pie)

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Ready, Set, Start Your ovens and Bake!

It’s FINALLY time? Are You Ready? You can find a few recipes to whet your appetite & inspire you here. Click on the badge for more details. All regular posts will appear directly below this round up for the next 2 weeks.

When participating, please use common blog etiquette and courtesy by linking your participating bread recipes back to Joy of Desserts and 3 Sides of Crazy, and visiting the other participants.

You can see my bread recipes for this year here.
wildatheart

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

2nd ANNUAL BREAD ROUND-UP

~ We are looking for all sorts of breads: quick breads, savory breads, sweet ones, yeast breads, no-knead breads, 5-minute breads, vintage or gluten-free breads, etc, etc, etc!

~ Link all your bread recipes to MckLinky below, right now, through Nov. 15. Also link at Tamy’s 3 Sides of Crazy, for more traffic to your blog. Encounter difficulties with MckLinky or Tamy’s Mr. Linky? Just leave your links in comments.

~ When participating, please use common blog etiquette and courtesy by linking your participating bread recipes back to Joy of Desserts and 3 Sides of Crazy, and visiting the other participants.

~ Have fun blog hopping through the bread recipes, make new friends, find new family-favorite recipes, comment, enjoy the process of community-building.

Here are just some of the bread recipes I have for you! Muffins are a type of bread, not a yeast bread of course, but bread none-the-less. Take a look at my explanation in my post for a prize-winning ginger cheese muffin recipe. I also have a vintage apple breakfast bread recipe, and brown sugar bread too. Don’t miss out on this easy great depression chocolate bread recipe, and this delicious pecan, date, raisin bread recipe. Plus I’ll be adding more bread recipes for the next two weeks too. Be sure to come back to add more of your own recipes and see what else is new.

And don’t miss out on last year’s 35 bread recipes, either:1. Easy Chocolate Bread
2. Pecan Date Raisin Bread
3. Pan lavash
4. Pan integral con sésamo, amapola y linaza
5. Panecillos de leche
6. Pan árabe
7. Panecillos suizos
8. Sally Lunn Bread
9. Cuban Bread
10. Focaccia
11. Cinnamon Buns/Mennonite Recipe
12. Monkey Bread
13. Beer Bread
14. Apple Bread
15. Banana Bread Cranked Up
16. Bread Machine Oatmeal Bread
17. Grandmother Wren’s found recipe links
18. Family Favorite Whole Wheat Bread

19. Apple Bread w/Cream Cheese Icing
20. Banana Raisin Nut Bread
21. Beer Bread
22. Brioche Egg Bread
23. Bubble Bread
24. Buttermilk Bread
25. Cheddar Cheese Biscuits
26. Cinnamon Banana Bread
27. Cinnamon Raisin Loaf
28. Crunchy Parmesan Croutons
29. Honey Banana Whole Wheat Bread
30. Lemon Banana Nut Bread
31. Orange Banana Nut Bread
32. Parmesan Rolls
33. Tropical Apricot Mango Bread
34. White Cheddar Biscuits
35. Oat Sunflower Bread/Sesame Oat Bread

Please use common blog etiquette and courtesy by linking your participating bread recipes back to Joy of Desserts and 3 Sides of Crazy, and visiting the other participants. It helps everyone if you leave a link to your participating recipe in McKlinky, rather than to your main blog, and let us know what your recipe is.
aprons 3

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

You’re invited to a Thanksgiving Soiree’


WHEN: Sunday, November 15th ~ Saturday, November, 28th, 2009
WHERE: OuR KrAzY kItChEn
RSVP: MR. LINKY

We’re having a party here at OuR KrAzY kItChEn and you’re invited. Bring your favorite recipe, decorating idea, pictures, anecdotes and let’s have some fun together.
  • Do you have a special pumpkin pie recipe recipe?
  • What is your favorite side dish recipe?
  • Do you have a favorite apple recipe?
  • Do you have special way to carve a turkey?
  • How about a party punch that’s perfect for the Thanksgiving crowd?
  • What is your idea of a best decorating idea?
We’ll post Mr. Linky on November 15th and leave him in place through November 28th. Write your post piece and come link it up. We’ll all have some time to blog hop and see each other and try recipes.

wildatheart

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

2nd Annual Bread Round Up

It’s FINALLY time? Are You Ready? Here are a few recipes to whet your appetite & inspire you. Click on the badge for more details. All regular posts will appear directly below this round up for the next 2 weeks.

When participating, please use common blog etiquette and courtesy by linking your participating bread recipes back to Joy of Desserts and 3 Sides of Crazy, and visiting the other participants.

TIPS for GREAT Bread Making

  • Always keep flours in airtight, moisture proof containers.
  • Once cooled, always store breads in airtight bags in a cool dry place.
  • When freezing bread, always cool first and do NOT frost or decorate. Wrap them first in airtight plastic and then foil. Store no more than 3 months.
  • To warm breads, wrap bread in foil. Place in 350 degree oven for 15-20 minutes.
  • Dark flours such as rye ore whole wheat have less strength and should be mixed with bread flour for better results.
  • Always cool breads fully before slicing. For best results use a serrated knife or electric knife for even slices.
  • Kneading is a very important part of the bread making process. Kneading develops the protein structure which in turn produces higher volumes.
  • Flavor and texture improve by allowing the dough to double in the size. Be patient.
  • Allowing the dough to “REST” for 15 minutes also helps to achieve the desired volume.
  • The true test for doneness is when the loaf sounds hollow!
  • Remove from pans immediately and cool on wire racks to prevent them from becoming soggy.
ADOBE BREAD A Native American bread made by the pueblo-dwelling Indians of the Southwest and baked in the adobe ovens common to their dwellings. The bread’s made from unbleached flour, salt, yeast, water, lard or shortening and sometimes sugar and/or eggs. A hot fire is started in the adobe oven and allowed to burn out. The ashes are immediately removed and the bread is then baked. This crusty bread of the Pueblo Indians is still baked today in beehive shaped ovens. The round loaves are often decorated with symbols for special occasions.
2 cups whole wheat flour, medium grind
1/4 cup fine white sugar
1 tablespoon instant yeast
1/4 cup vegetable shortening or vegetable oil
2 cups warm water, 100-110 degrees
3 – 4 cups unbleached bread flour (preferred) or all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons salt (fine sea salt preferred)

MIXER METHOD:

  • In a large mixing bowl, place whole wheat flour, sugar, dough enhancer if using, yeast and shortening; use the paddle attachment to mix on low speed until well-combined.
  • Add warm water and beat for 1 minute or so.
  • Stir in 3 cups of bread flour and mix on low speed until the dough forms a soft ball.
  • Change to the dough hook and knead on medium speed about 5 minutes, adding only enough additional bread flour to make a manageable dough. The dough should have pulled away from the sides of the bowl but can still stick to the bottom of the bowl.
  • Turn the dough out onto a floured board let it rest 10 minutes, covered with a towel.
  • Knead the dough an additional 4-5 minutes or until the dough is soft and pliable, tacky but not sticky.
  • Place in lightly greased bowl, cover with plastic wrap and let rise at room temperature (72 deg.F.) 45-60 minutes or until doubled in bulk.
  • Spray a large baking sheet with PURE and set aside. Gently deflate the dough and turn out onto a lightly floured board.
  • Divide in half and let rest 5 minutes.
  • Shape each half into a round, stretching the dough across the top and tucking under; place the rounds on opposite wnsa of the cookie sheet.
  • Cover and let rise in a warm place 40-50 minutes or until almost doubled.
  • Meanwhile, preheat oven to 375 F. Using a lame or sharp knnife, make 1/2 inch deep slashes across each loaf (in lattice design if desired).
  • Sprinkle each loaf lightly with bread flour. Bake 35-40 minutes until loaves are deep, golden brown and register 200 degrees on an instant thermometer.
  • Remove from the pan and cool completely on a wire rack before slicing. Yields 2 loaves
MANUAL METHOD:
Follow the above instructions, kneading the dough by hand about 10-12 minutes.

NOTE~this is best made using a stand mixer!

APPLESAUCE RAISIN BREAD
2 cups applesauce
2 JUMBO eggs, beaten
1 cup fine sugar
1/2 cup butter, melted
4 cups flour

4 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoon cinnamon
2 teaspoon nutmeg
1 cup golden raisins
1/4 cup golden rum
1 cup minced walnuts
  • In a large bowl, beat together the applesauce, eggs, sugar and melted butter.
  • In a smaller bowl, sift together the dry ingredients.
  • Stir the dry ingredients into the applesauce mixture and mix only until smooth.
  • Add the raisins and nuts.
  • Pour into 2 greased 9x5x3-inch loaf pans and bake in a 350 degree oven for 50 minutes or until a wooden toothpick inserted into centers comes out clean.
BUTTER HORN ROLLS
1 cup scalded milk, cooled

1 package yeast, dissolved in 1/8 cup warm water
1/2 cup unsalted butter, softened

1/2 cup sugar
1 teaspoon salt

3 eggs, beaten
4 1/2 cups flour
  • Add yeast mixture to cooled scalded milk.
  • Combine butter, sugar and salt with electric mixer on low.
  • Add milk and yeast to butter mixture.
  • Add beaten eggs.
  • Add half of flour and increase speed to medium. Beat well for two minutes.
  • Stir in remaining flour by hand to form a very soft dough.
  • Let rise till double – about 3 hours.
  • Divide into 3 equal parts. Roll each portion on lightly floured board to 9 -10 inch circle.
  • Brush with butter.
  • Cut each circle into 12 wedges (like a pizza).
  • Roll from wide end (similar to a crescent roll) and place on cookie sheet.
  • Let rise in a warm place for an hour before baking.
  • Bake at 400 for 10 minutes.
  • Makes 3 dozen
BUTTERMILK CORNBREAD
1 cup yellow cornmeal

1/3 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 egg, beaten
1 cup buttermilk
  • Sift together dry ingredients.
  • Add egg and buttermilk, mixing well.
  • Pour into greased, heated 8-inch or 9-inch iron skillet.
  • Bake at 400° for 20 minutes, or until lightly browned.
CHOCOLATE WALNUT BREAD CAKE
CAKE

2 cups flour

1/2 cup sugar
Pinch of salt

1 teaspoon cinnamon
2 tablespoons butter, softened
2/3 ounce fresh yeast
1/3 cup milk

1/2 cup heavy cream
1 egg

FILLING
1 cup + heavy cream
12 squares Baker’s semi-sweet chocolate, finely chopped
1/3 cup walnuts, minced
6 tablespoons butter, melted & cooled
  • Sift the flour into a large mixing bowl.
  • Add the sugar, cinnamon, salt, butter, yeast, milk, cream and egg. Using the hook attachment blend for 5 minutes – this can be done manually if you prefer. After 5 minutes the dough will be ready, so flour your hands to avoid sticking.
  • Knead and allow to rise.
  • On a floured surface, knead the dough and transfer to a bowl.
  • Cover the bowl with a four sack towel and allow to rise for 2 hours in a warm place.
  • In a saucepan heat the cream over medium heat bringing it to a slow boil. Remove from heat.
  • Pour the hot cream over the chopped chocolate and mix together.
  • Add the butter and whip with the spoon.
  • Stir in walnuts and allow to cool.
  • Press down on the dough and transfer to a floured surface. With a rolling pin, flatten the dough into a round about half an inch thick.
  • Pour the chocolate sauce over the dough and spread evenly with the rubber spatula.
  • Using a large knife, cut the dough into thick slices approximately 2 1/2 inches wide.
  • Roll slices cinnamon roll style.
  • Transfer the slices to a spring form pan with the edges very slightly touching.
  • Allow to sit for 15 minutes before baking.
  • Preheat the oven 350 degrees.
  • Brush the top of the cake with butter and bake 15-20 minutes.
  • Remove the cake from the oven, brush once more with butter and sprinkle with powdered sugar.
HONEY NUT BRAN MUFFINS
1/2 cup honey

1 1/2 cups flour
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 cups bran
2 tablespoons butter, melted

1 1/4 cups buttermilk

1 teaspoon maple extract
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 tablespoon molasses
1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice
1 egg, beaten
1/4 cup walnuts, finely chopped
  • Sift together flour, soda and salt. Combine with the bran.
  • Add remaining ingredients, mixing just until well blended.
  • Pour batter into greased and lightly floured muffin pans and bake at 425° for 25-30 minutes or until done in center.
ORANGE OATMEAL MUFFINS
1 cup flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 cup quick-cooking oats
1/4 cup sugar + 2 tablespoons sugar

1 JUMBO egg, beaten
1 tablespoon grated orange rind
1/2 cup fresh orange juice with high pulp
1/4 cup 2% milk
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1/2 teaspoon grated orange rind
PURE
  • Combine the flour, baking powder, salt, oats, and 1/4 cup sugar in a large bowl. Make a well in center of the flour mixture.
  • Stir together egg, 1 tablespoon grated orange rind, orange juice, milk and oil.
  • Add to flour mixture, stirring just until moistened.
  • Spray muffin tins with PURE or line with papers.
  • Spoon batter into muffin pans , filling three-fourths full.
  • Stir together 2 tablespoons sugar, orange rind, and ground cinnamon until blended.
  • Sprinkle evenly over tops of muffins.
  • Bake at 400 for 15 minutes or until muffins are lightly browned.
  • Remove muffins from pans immediately, and cool on a wire rack.
PARMESAN CHEESE BREAD
3 1/4 cups unbleached flour
1 tablespoon active dry yeast
2 teaspoons sea salt
1 1/3 cup warm water
1/2 cup freshly grated Asiago Parmesan Cheese
extra-extra virgin olive oil
  • Sift together the four, yeast and salt.
  • Stir in the water until dough forms.
  • Sprinkle with 1/2 the cheese.
  • Transfer to a well floured surface.
  • Knead until soft, elastic and no longer sticky (about 10 minutes). Add flour as necessary to reduce stickiness.
  • Knead the dough until it remains rounded and doesn’t flatten out when left to sit for a few minutes.
  • Arrange into a round.
  • Brush the surface with olive oil.
  • Cover loosely with a tea towel and let rise in a warm place until double in size (about 2 hours).
  • Preheat oven to 425 degrees.
  • Brush a 9 inch round pan with olive oil.
  • Put remaining cheese on a plate.
  • Punch down the dough and knead a few more times with fresh flour.
  • Divide dough into 12 pieces.
  • Roll each piece into a ball.
  • Roll each ball in the cheese and then place in pan with the edges touching. 9 balls around the outside, 3 balls in the center.
  • Cover with a flour sack towel and allow to rise again.
  • Cut a small slash in the top of each ball.
  • Sprinkle with more Parmesan cheese.
  • Bake for 10 minutes and the reduce oven temperature to 375 degrees and continue to bake until golden and crispy, about 20-30 minutes more.
  • Serve hot or transfer to a wire rack and cool.
POLENTA BREAD

Polenta is made with ground yellow or white cornmeal and was originally made with Chestnut meal in ancient times. As it is known today, polenta derives from earlier forms of grain mush (known as puls or pulmentum in Latin or more commonly as gruel or porridge) commonly eaten in Roman times and after.

3 cups unbleached bread flour
1/2 cup finely ground polenta
2 teaspoons quick rise yeast
1 teaspoon sea salt
1 1/3 cups warm water
1 tablespoon extra-extra virgin olive oil
1 Jumbo egg, beaten
  • In a large bowl sift together the flour, polenta, yeast and salt.
  • Stir in the water and olive oil until dough forms.
  • Transfer to a well floured surface.
  • Knead until soft, elastic and no longer sticky (about 10 minutes). Add flour as necessary to reduce stickiness.
  • Knead the dough until it remains rounded and doesn’t flatten out when left to sit for a few minutes.
  • Arrange into a round.
  • Cover loosely with a tea towel and let rise in a warm place until double in size (about an hour).
  • Preheat oven to 425 degrees.
  • When dough has risen, use a VERY sharp knife and slash the center of the loaf.
  • Brush the surface with the beaten egg.
  • Sprinkle cornmeal on the baking sheet and then transfer the loaf on top.
  • Bake for 15 minutes and the reduce oven temperature to 375 degrees and continue to bake until golden and crispy, about 30-35 minutes more.
  • Transfer to a wire rack and cool.
SOURDOUGH STARTER & BREAD
The novel thing about sourdough baking is that it requires that you keep something alive in your fridge. Think of your starter as a pet that needs to be fed. Sourdough “starter” is a batter of flour and water, filled with living yeast and bacteria. The yeast and bacteria form a stable symbiotic relationship, and as long as you keep the starter fed can live for centuries, a thriving colony of microorganisms. To make sourdough bread, you blend the starter with some flour and make dough. The yeast propogates, and leavens your bread. This is how you make your starter:

  • Select a container that your starter will live in. A wide-mouthed glass jar is best. A small crock with a loose lid is also great. You can also use a rubbermaid or tupperware container. Metallic containers are a bad idea; some of them are reactive and can ruin your starter (for the same reason, avoid using metal utensils to stir your starter).
  • Blend a cup of warm water and a cup of plain unbleached flour, and pour it into the jar. That’s the whole recipe! If you want, you can add a little commercial yeast to a starter to “boost” it. Note that starter made with commercial yeast often produces a bread with less distinctive sour flavor than the real thing.
  • Every 24 Hours, Feed the Starter. You should keep the starter in a warm place; 70-80 degrees Farenheit is perfect. This allows the yeast already present in the flour (and in the air) to grow rapidly. Temperatures hotter than 100 degrees or so will kill it.
  • The way you feed the starter is to (1) throw away half of it and then (2) add a half-cup of flour and a half-cup of water. Do this every 24 hours. Within three or four days (it can take longer, a week or more, and it can happen more quickly) you should start getting lots of bubbles throughought, and a pleasant sour or beery smell. The starter may start to puff up, too. This is good. Here’s the gist: When your starter develops a bubbly froth, it is done.
  • Refrigerate the Starter. Keep the starter in your fridge, with a lid on it. Allow a little breathing space in the lid. Once the starter is chilled, it needs to be fed only once a week. Realistically, you can get away with less; it’s important to remember that your starter is a colony of life-forms that are almost impossible to kill (except with extreme heat). Even starving them is difficult.
  • Aside from weekly feeding, the only other thing you need to worry about is hooch. Hooch is a layer of watery liquid (often dark) that contains alchohol. It smells a bit like beer, because it is a bit like beer – but don’t drink it! Hooch builds up in your starter, especially in the fridge. Just pour it off or stir it back in. It doesn’t hurt anything. If your starter is looking dry, stir it back in. If your starter is plenty wet, pour it off. Just remember that hooch is nothing to worry about!
  • Several hours before you plan to make your dough (recipe below), you need to make a sponge. A “sponge” is just another word for a bowl of warm, fermented batter. This is how you make your sponge.
  • Take your starter out of the fridge. Pour it into a large glass or plastic bowl. Meanwhile, wash the jar and dry it.
  • Add a cup of warm water and a cup of flour to the bowl. Stir well, and set it in a warm place for several hours. This is called “proofing,” another word for fermenting.
  • Watch for Froth and Sniff. When your sponge is bubbly and has a white froth, and it smells a little sour, it is ready. The longer you let the sponge sit, the more sour flavor you will get. The proofing-time varies. Some starters can proof up to frothiness in an hour or two. Some take 6-8 hours, or even longer. Just experiment and see how long yours takes. If you’re going to bake in the morning, set your sponge out to proof overnight.

Of course, there are a lot of recipes for sourdough bread. There are also recipes for sourdough rolls, sourdough pancakes, sourdough pretzels, sourdough bagels…

You should have some leftover sponge and that is your starter for next time: Put it into the jar, and give it a fresh feed of a half-cup each of flour and warm water. Keep it in the fridge as above.

BASIC SOURDOUGH RECIPE
2 Cups of sponge (proofed starter)
3 Cups of unbleached flour
2 tablespoons softened butter
4 teaspoons of sugar
2 teaspoons of salt

  • To the sponge, add the sugar, salt, and softened butter instead, or no oil at all). Mix well, then knead in the flour a half-cup at a time. Knead in enough flour to make a good, flexible bread dough. You can do this with an electric mixer, a bread machine on “dough cycle,” or a food processor. You can also do it with a big bowl and your bare hands. Keep in mind that flour amounts are approximate; flour varies in absorbency, and your sponge can vary in wetness. Use your judgement; treat it like ordinary white or french bread dough. Trust your hands and eyes more than the recipe, always.
  • Let the dough rise in a warm place, in a bowl covered loosely with a flour sack towel . Note that sourdough rises more slowly than most yeast bread. Let the dough double in bulk. When a finger poked into the top of the dough creates a pit that doesn’t spring back), you’ve got a risen dough.
  • Punch the dough down and knead it a little more. Make a loaf and place it on a baking sheet (lightly greased or sprinkled with cornmeal). Slit the top if you like, and cover the loaf with a paper towel and place it in a warm place to rise again, until doubled in bulk.
  • Place the pan with the loaf in your oven, and then turn your oven to 350 degrees and bake the bread for 30-45 minutes. Do not preheat the oven. The loaf is done when the crust is brown and the bottom sounds hollow when thumped with a wooden spoon. Turn the loaf out onto a cooling rack or a towel and let it cool for an hour before slicing.

SOURDOUGH TOMATO CHEESE BREAD
1 1/2 cups sourdough starter
1 cup warm water (110 degrees F)
1 (.25 ounce) package active dry yeast
1 cup warm tomato juice
2 teaspoons white sugar
1 teaspoon salt
7 cups all-purpose flour
2 cups grated Sargento sharp cheddar cheese

  • Dissolve yeast in 1 cup warm water, set aside.
  • In large bowl; mix starter and tomato juice. Add yeast mixture, salt, sugar and stir well.
  • Add 1 cup of flour at a time and beat well to develop the gluten.
  • Add cheese just until well blended.
  • When a stiff dough forms, turn out onto a floured surface and knead until smooth and elastic, adding the last 1 cup of flour as you go.
  • Turn into greased bowl and lightly grease top, cover with towel and place in draft free area for 2 hours. Will double in bulk.
  • Punch down and divide dough in two, form into rounds and place each on a baking sheet that has been sprinkled generously with cornmeal.
  • Let rise 1/2 hour, rub top lightly with flour and slash with sharp knife. Bake at 350 degrees F for 45-60 minutes or until bottoms are lightly browned.
  • For a soft crust, cool under a clean flour sack dishtowel. For a harder European type crust, cool without.

♥♥final blog signature. ♥♥

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...